Detailed July/August 2016 trip report

Greg writes:

Chapter 3 – Practical Information

In the section “red tape” I suggest specifying that Visas on Arrival are not issued at Dire Dawa airport, notwithstanding daily flights from Djibouti. Tourists arriving from Djibouti must either obtain their visa in advance from the Ethiopian embassy in Djibouti city or fly directly to Bole airport.

In the section “getting around”, I found your characterization of the Ethiopian Airlines travel experience to be accurate. However, in booking several flights with Ethiopian during the course of my stay I found considerable disparities in the application of policies, procedures and pricing – as well as general helpfulness – depending on who I was dealing with (i.e. Ethiopian Airlines call centre, Airline ticket offices in various cities and independent travel agencies). I also found considerable variability in security measures at various airports, with Axum having by far the most stringent checks, related presumably to the widespread peddling of ancient Axumite coins in this region.

Chapter 5 – Addis Ababa

In the section “Getting there and away“, I think you understate the number of international flights at terminal 1. As far as I can make out most if not all destinations in the Gulf are served by terminal 1, and by extension any other destinations involving a Gulf-based airline (e.g. Qatar). We personally found this to be problematic as we travelled to Ethiopia from Canada on Qatar, and our hotel shuttle driver was waiting for us at terminal 2 based on the assumption that this would be where he could find us.

While I generally found your review of Zeist Lodge (page 151) to be accurate, your characterization of its breakfast as one of the best in the country is overstated in my opinion. While admittedly I only stayed there one night, I found the breakfast to be middling in terms of quality and the staff stingy with refills and extras (e.g. jam or butter for the toast provided).

On your map of the city centre and Piazza on pages 154-55, please note that the Ethiopian Airline office in Piazza has moved from the location on Cunningham Street indicated on the map to Churchill Avenue at Wawel (i.e. in the Eliana Hotel complex) at the south-west corner of the intersection. Also, I suggest you consider adding a review of Eliana Hotel in your guide; I stayed in this relatively new hotel two nights in July 2016 and I was impressed with the quality of the rooms, the good breakfast and friendly service.

On your map of Bole on pages 158-59, I suggest you add a reference to the post office located on Olympia Circle, between Africa Avenue and Gabon Street. Also, the location indicated on the map for the Jewel of India Restaurant appears wrong. It is not on Gabon Street but rather a street which runs parallel to it.

Under Art Galleries and Installations on page 168, Netsa Art Village no longer exists. I spoke with the coordinator in August 2016 and I was told that it closed down about a year ago after the park authorities indicated that they did not wish to renew the Art Village’s lease.

In your description of Piazza on page 174, you may wish to add a similar warning to the one you indicate for Merkato with respect to pickpocketing. My wife and I were targeted four to five times in the area over a span of just two days. Although none of the attempts was successful, it would certainly be advisable for visitors to stay alert at all times.

I would suggest you add Downtown Café and Restaurant to your Piazza-area restaurant listings (pages 161-162). It is located on the east side of Churchill Avenue just north of Eliana Hotel and it is very good. Popular with young Ethiopians and stylishly appointed, it serves both Ethiopian and Italian dishes, along with excellent fruit juice. A mushroom pizza costs 99 birr; fresh juice 26 birr.

Chapter 6 – Around Addis Ababa

Under your entry for the Kuriftu Resort on page 185, please note that “facials” are not offered in the spa, only manicures and massages.

Under your description of Adadi Maryam (page 197), the entry fee is now USD5 (100 birr), up from the US3 indicated in the guide. Also, there is a typo on the 3rd line of the final paragraph on page 197: “excavation” should be replaced with “expedition”.

As for the Tiya stelae field, the entry is now USD6.50 (130 birr) rather than USD6 indicated.

Chapter 7 – Western Amhara

In your introduction to Bahir Dar (page 227), you suggest that hassle has lessened in recent years. While I do know how bad it was in the past, the degree of hassle here was the greatest of any town or city I visited in Ethiopia. While one of our most unpleasant experiences was at the bus station – where an aggressive gang of touts was very unpleasant to deal with in their attempts to get us on “their” minibus to Gonder (and we heard from another couple who had a similar experience), we found there was generally a high degree of street harassment (e.g. aggressive begging, pushing tours, etc), particularly in the evening near the lake and in downtown.

With respect to the information provided on the Blue Nile Falls (page 238-239), we were charged an admission fee of USD5 (100 birr) per person, not USD2.50 as you indicate. With respect to guides, we found there was considerable pressure at the ticket office and at the trailhead to take one, but once we had run this gauntlet the hassles on the trail itself were low-key and unobtrusive (i.e. young children selling curios, people wanting to hold an umbrella for you, etc). Visiting in late July the Falls were very impressive, although the path was quite muddy and slippery. I would also note that the road is currently being upgraded, and consequently it is a long, bumpy trip from Bahir Dar at present.

With respect to Gondar hotels (page 262), we stayed several nights at the Taye Belay and I was impressed by the helpfulness and flexibility of the staff. I would highly recommend this hotel on this basis alone, notwithstanding the rather crummy breakfast on offer. I was less impressed with the Lodge de Chateau. We looked into staying here based on positive reviews from another tourist, but I was not impressive by the manager’s lack of flexibility regarding low season pricing and the rooms seemed dark and poorly appointed, certainly much worse value for money than the Taye Belay, where we were paying under USD50 for three people in a top notch room.

With respect to Gondar restaurants (page 263-264) your review of Four Sisters is right on the mark. However, I was very disappointed with Habesha Coffee. In addition to unfriendly staff, we wait ages for the fruit juices we ordered, they got the order wrong and it seemed as though they had failed to clean the blender as there was a strong taste of banana in what was supposed to be mango juice.

In your map of Gondar (page 261), the placement of Ras Gimb appears wrong. You may want to double check, but I believe it should be placed further to the North, i.e. close to the Oil Libya gas station.

With respect to Fasil Ghebbi (page 266), while the admission fee remains USD10, the woman working in the ticket office was the most blatantly corrupt ticket seller of any museum or historic site we encountered during our trip. Not only was it very difficult to get her to produce a receipt but she also attempted to short-change as well.

With respect to Kuskuam, which we were very impressed with, I would simply note that the cost of a bajaj was about USD3 from the city centre.

Chapter 8 – Eastern Amhara

Under “tourist information” for Lalibela on page 323, it appears that the tourism office is no longer at the location indicated. I was told it is located within the church ticket office.

With respect to Lalibela restaurants (page 327) please note that the Holy Land Restaurant has closed. A seemingly new and very nicely appointed restaurant/cafe is the XO, located in the Lalibela cultural centre. They serve Ethiopian and western food as well as a good selection of drinks.

In your description of Bet Gebriel-Rafael, please note that the “rickety wooden walkway” has been replaced by a solid concrete bridge.

Chapter 9 – Tigrai

Under Axum’s “getting there and away” section on page 345, you may wish to mention that the security checks at the airport are by far the most stringent we experienced anywhere in the country – including international departures from Bole airport in Addis. It appears the focus is on searching travellers for Axumite coins and other antiquities.

While there is a fine-looking tourism office near the big fig tree/piazza, it was locked up throughout our stay in Axum.

 

Under Axum hotels (page 347), the phone number for Yeha Hotel is wrong. The correct number is 0347-752377. We stayed at Yeha Hotel for two nights and I agree with your assessment: beautiful grounds and setting overlooking the town, but both the rooms and the hotel generally are in need of refurbishment, plus the television in our room wasn’t working, breakfast was very poor and staff came across as entirely unhelpful and clueless. On the positive side, the restaurant terrace is very pleasant and we enjoyed watching the monkeys cavorting in nearb trees and bushes.

In your map of Axum (page 348) I noted two errors in your map. Ethiopian Airlines is no longer at the location indicated near Sol Internet. It has now moved several blocks to the east on the north side of the street near the Ark Hotel. Also, B-Life Nightclub is at the east end rather than the west end of the block, i.e. diagonally across the intersection from Atse Kaleb.

Under “other practicalities” in Axum on page 350 you may wish to add a reference a laundry. Located on a side-street south-west of the Dashen bank, its phone number is 0922-163539/0914-492931

Chapter 11 – Harar and the Far East

Under Dire Dawa hotels, we stayed at the Samrat and we were quite disappointed. Even taking into account the lower standards that one comes to expect in Ethiopian hotels, the Samrat was truly dire. In addition to exceedingly unfriendly and unhelpful staff, the breakfast was awful (everything was cold and barely edible), the pool was closed and our room was barely acceptable. The only positive was the Bollywood Restauran, which was quite good.

On your map of Dire Dawa on page 437 you show a bridge crossing the Dechatu river near the Coca-Cola bottling plant. This bridge does not in fact exist.

Under “what to see and do” in Dire Dawa on page 439, I visited what you describe as the site of the “new railway museum currently being established” and was told by the coordinator that its establishment is now doubtful due to the loss of government support for the venture. That being said, entering the gate to the south-west of the old train station you will find a train wagon set up for the train yards’ official tour guide, a long-time railway employee who speaks good English and French. She offers extensive tours of the site, including visits to the old roundhouse, workshops, etc. There is no set admission fee but a tip is expected.

Under “where to eat and drink” in Harar on page 449, I find you are overly positive about Hirut Restaurant. While the setting is certainly nice, the food is on par with other options (e.g. Fresh Touch) and we found the service to be poor, and it didn’t help that the waitress disappeared when it was time to bring us the change from our bill.

Under “other practicalities” in Harar on page 449, you may wish to consider adding what I believe may be the town’s only travel agent, which sells Ethiopian Airline tickets, etc. It is called Sofi Travel Service (tel 0911-029602 / 0256-664422) and it is located on the south side of the main street between the Ras Hotel and Cozi Pizzeria. I bought airline tickets from Dire Dawa to Addis here, and the woman running the agency was quite helpful.

Under the “hyena men of Harar” (page 453), it may be worth pointing out that at least one imitator has sprung up beyond the two hyena men based at the traditional feeding sites near Felana and Erer gates respectively. On our first evening in Harar we made our own way to the “Christian” feeding site, but arriving at about 6:30pm there was no one about and we left just before 7pm. Finding out later that that the feeding does not actually start until after 7pm (i.e. nightfall) the next day we opted to make arrangements with a bajaj driver to take us to one of the sites. After leaving the old city through the Erer gate he took us to a rural spot about 1km south-east of the “Islamic” feeding site where a man who claimed to be the son of the original hyena man was charging 100 birr per person, which we negotiated down to 250 birr for three people. Two other parties of tourists later showed up with their guides in tow. While I expect the experience was not dissimilar to what we would have had at one of the traditional sites (i.e. about 6-8 hyenas came around and tourists who wanted to feed a hyena with meat on a stick could do so), I was initially quite concerned that we were being scammed.

Under your entry for the Rimbaud museum, you indicate the entry fee as USD1. The entry fee seems to have risen to USD2.

I found your overview of Babile Elephant Sanctuary (page 457-458) to be very helpful. However, you may wish to consider adding the following details. Given that spotting any elephants generally requires hiking through the bush, it is important for visitors to come appropriate dressed (i.e. thick trousers and closed shoes), given the large number of cacti and other thorn-bearing plants about. Also, I was surprised by the extent of human encroachment on the Sanctuary, with quite a few people and many camels and cows grazing, which apparently has served to push the elephants into more remote areas. Notwithstanding the timing of our visit in early August it took us 3-4 hours of searching before we came upon a group of three elephants. In addition to the cost of the car, driver and guide – which in our case cost us 3,000 birr, we also had to pay an entry fee to the park (100 birr per person) and 200 birr for the scout (there were three of us on the visit). Finally, those any locals who help to locate an elephant expect a tip. In our case it was a group of children, to whom we paid 50 birr at the suggestion of the scout

March 2016 trip report

Nicole Wilhelm writes:

Visa: As the Ethiopian Embassy in Switzerland was running out of visa stickers, we had to apply visa on arrival, which we have received within 10 Minutes and without any hassles at all. So if you’re flight one of the earliest in the morning, its cheaper and easier to get the visa on spot.

The tram in Addis is working great; its clean, cheap and worth to use… just do not try to enter at rush hour; it’s almost impossible to squeeze in….!

We stayed at Kefetew Guest House, which is a bit out of the city center, but within walking distance to a tram station. Great breakfast and on request Ganet is also cooking dinner …and she is very helpful and is going an extra mile for her guests!

In Bahir Dar we used Delano Hotel; free airport shuttle, very nice, spacious rooms, good staff, extremly good value for money …and of course beds do have mosquito net!

Simien Mountains: We have done a 10-day Trekking with Ethiopia Eco Tour and Trek (Addis Yimer). The trip was very well organized by Addis, we had an excellent guide and I believe the best team with us; the cook prepared daily delicious meals (dinner with soup, min. 3-4 different vegetables, rice or pasta and sometimes even with meat)… and in awareness of the “faranji stomach” they have only used cooked water to wash vegetables etc! Really highly recommendable Touroperator for Simien!!

Bahir Dar, Gondar, Lalibela: it was not a problem to walk arround alone; beggers were very few and the street boys were OK… of course the asked for money, pen etc … but mostly they just wanted to practice their english.

To vist Awash National Park and Abyiatta Shalla, we have used ETT Travel (Ethio Travel and Tours)… This was the only “downpoint” of the whole trip…. We have booked (and confirmed as well) Camping in Awash N.P including Cook and cooking materials, water for washing etc., all meals and 2 nights 10’000 Flamingo Lodge, driver, car etc. However, camping then turned out to be 2 nights without meals and without washing water; we had to organize to eat at the nearby Awash Falls Lodge. Driver was always coming 30 Minutes to 1 hour late. And the driver nor ETT did know where 10,000 Flamingo Lodge is situated… and this after having had over 5 weeks time in advance to check on this… In all the years travelling in Africa I have never experienced such a bad Touroperator.
The location of the 10,000 Flamingos Lodge is mind blowing! Staff very kind, all rooms have great views. Time to relax, walk and see flamingos. In my opinon the only place in Abiyatta Shalla National Park, which is really worth to visit!

Ethiopia is certainly a special country and well worth to visit!

Feb 2016 trip report

Andrew writes:

Just back from an Ethiopian tour (Feb 2016) and really enjoyed the context provided by this book!

A couple of updates/plugs from my trip:

VISA ON ARRIVAL
It was difficult to find up-to-date information on the requirements for getting a visa at Bole airport. Note that you do NOT need passport photos. They have modern webcams that take your picture there on the spot. Also, to clear up one point I found confusing, you can pay the fee in a variety of major currencies, not just US dollars. I paid 50 euros and even got change in euros! There is a foreign exchange office pre-visa if you get really stuck.

SIMIEN MOUNTAINS
As there are sooo many guide and tour options for the Simien mountains, I wanted to put in a plug for our super-organized, super friendly local guide Gismu Syum with Ethiopia Trek (http://www.ethiopiatrek.com/). He’s incredibly responsive over e-mail (rare indeed!) and a very good choice for budget conscious travelers, particularly those organizing their Ethiopia tour independently and just needing a guide for the Simiens and/or Gondar. Personally, I cannot even imagine trying to go through all the red tape to organize a trip myself in the Simiens to save a few bucks when you could go with someone who knows the ropes and won’t charge too much for bringing you through it, like Gismu!

I would also note that Chennek camp was a highlight and I strongly recommend doing at least a three-night trek in order to get at least that far.

Note that the entire village of Geech has agreed to a government proposal to relocate and will begin moving out of the park boundaries in March 2016. While this will definitely have a positive impact on the wildlife in the region by restoring the heavily farmed land, it does remove one of the few reliable village stops in the early stages of the Simiens route.

Correction to 7th edition Visa on Arrival information

In the 7th edition of Bradt Ethiopia, we incorrectly state that passport-holders from all European Union countries can obtain a Visa on Arrival at Bole Airport.

In fact the list of ‘tourist-generating countries’ eligible for Visa on Arrival excludes several member states that joined the EU in or after 2004.

According to Ethiopian Airlines, the full list of countries eligible for Visa on Arrival is as follows: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China (including passports issued in Hong Kong and MACAO), Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greek, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, North Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States.

We strongly recommend you confirm this information independently before you travel, as it always subject to change.

Note, also, that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website saying you can request a visa online if your country doesn’t have an Ethiopian embassy is and has always been false.

 

 

Obtaining an Ethiopian Origin ID for a child

Report from a French citizen for Ethiopian Origin ID as a children of Ethiopian, Oct 2015

My wife being Ethiopian, we needed a residence permit for our lovely daughter.

Collect the following papers.
 Birth certificate. If birth took place abroad, first make it legalize by your Foreign Minister in home country, price 1Euro for French in Paris (French embassies have no longer the power to fully legalize). For French, this paper needs to be issued less than 3 months earlier by the Municipality. Then make confirm this paper by your embassy in Ethiopia (they’ll stamp for a fee, 415 etb for French). From this moment, everythings happens in Addis. Go to Kazanchis, at the Legalizations’ annex of Ethiopian Foreign Minister, they’ll stamp as well (300 etb, foreigner price assuming your children has another nationality by birth than Ethiopian).
 Photocopy of the above paper full of stamps
 If the above document is not from an english-speaking country, get an official translation in English made by any office at Stadium (138 etb for each translated sheet from French to English Adonay Translation)
 Photocopy of the chidren’s passport
 Photocopy of his/her visa
 Photocopies of both of the passports’ parents
 Two photos (took at about same age than the process’ moment).

At the main Immigration Minister, firstly go to the Welcome desk (the building right at your left when coming from Churchill and passing the small Police hut), until the desk of Foreigners. The clerk of the right side desk will check your papers (and give you back the multi-stamped-original), then give you a form that you have to fill, then back to the same clerck who will write an authorization on the back of the form, allowing yourself to enter in the main building, upstairs (security-checking).

Go to the desk number 77. They will just again check everything, registering on computer, and send you at desk 89. You’ll have to pay a fee of 416 etb, they give you a receipt with an appointment at the desk 90, exactly 48 hours after (2 working days after, at the same hour).

Opening times of this Minister : 8.00-17.30 (2.00-11.30 ethiopian). The lunch break takes place from 6.30 (ethiopian) to 7.30, and everybody will be pushed out of the Immigration complex, with a waiting list number.

Your children will then be given an Ethiopian Origin ID valid 5 years (residence permit in Ethiopia as well).

Obtaining a Temporary ID as a husband/wife of Ethiopian

Report from a French citizen for Ethiopian Temporary ID as a husband/wife of Ethiopian, Oct 2015

You normally need to be married since more than 2 years (to avoid false weddings), but when married abroad you can apply earlier, what was our case. The beginning of this process is different if the wedding took place in Ethiopia.

Collect the following papers.
 Wedding certificate. If wedding took place abroad, first make it legalize by your Foreign Minister in home country, 1Euro for French in Paris (French embassies have no longer the power to fully legalize). Then make confirm this paper by your embassy in Ethiopia (they’ll stamp for a fee, 415 etb for French). From this moment, everythings happens in Addis. Go to Kazanchis, at the Legalizations’ annex of Ethiopian Foreign Minister, they’ll stamp as well (150 etb, Ethiopian price because of Ethiopianity of your wife/husband).
 Photocopy of the above paper full of stamps
 If the above document is not from an english-speaking country, get an official translation in English made by any office at Stadium (138 etb for each translated sheet from French to English Adonay Translation)
 Bank account at your wife/husband name, credited of more than 35 000 etb. (Strongly advised bank : Commercial Bank of Ethiopia.)
 Photocopy of the above paper, both the holder’s page and the credit line.
 Photocopy of your passport
 Photocopy of your Ethiopian visa
 Photocopy of your wife/husband passport
 Letter by amharic from your wife/husband explaining the reason of the asking.

At the main Immigration Minister, first go to the Welcome desk (the building right at your left when coming from Churchill and passing the small Police hut), until the desk of Foreigners (the outside clerk will maybe say you than the present process is impossible!). The clerk of the right side desk will check your papers (and give you back the multi-stamped-original), then give you a form that you have to fill, then back to the same clerck who will write an authorization on the back of the form, allowing yourself to enter in the main building, upstairs (security-checking).

Go to the desk number 77. They will just again check everything, registering on computer, shoot you by a webcam, and send you at desk 89. You’ll have to pay a fee of 1500 etb (for French), they give you a receipt with an appointment at the desk 90, exactly 48 hours after (2 working days after, at the same hour).

Opening times of this Minister : 8.00-17.30 (2.00-11.30 ethiopian). The lunch break takes place from 6.30 (ethiopian) to 7.30, and everybody will be pushed out of the Immigration complex, with a waiting list number

You will then be given a 1-year Temporary ID (without work permit, that’s another story)

In the French case, your fresh card will allow yourself to register on the Counsular lists, and « enjoy » a number of services (like discounted fares on some civil status acts).