Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Gondar hotels

Posted: June 25, 2014 in Gonder, Uncategorized
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Elena, Teresa & Jaime write

We are a group of three travelling in the north area of Ethiopia!! We arrived yesterday night at Gondar & started looking for a good hotel to spend the night! We visited the Hibret Hotel (in the Bradt guide), but they treat to cheat as asking for 600 birr for a small twin dirty room! Afterwards we visited the Merkuriaw Alemaya Hotel, it still has very good prices (120\150 birr), not so good looking nor so clean, but not bad for the price.

Finally, by chance, we found the Michael Hotel (near to the L-Shape hotel). This hotel really merits your attention!!! Is really really clean, good looking, with white clean sheets and a well equipped bathroom with hot water and hydromassage shower and this twin room cost on ly 300 birr!!!! As we are three we are paying 350 birr for sharing the room, also because one of the beds is big enough. The staff is really friendly and they have free WiFi in all the floors!!

Our experience was so good, that we decided to Michael Hotel to your readers!

I’ve been trying to seek clarity on the situation with domestic fares since Ethiopian Airlines announced a 40% reduction in May (see http://www.newbusinessethiopia.com/index.php/en/market/106-travel-tips/799-ethiopian-airlines-cut-domestic-flights-rate-40)

So far as I can ascertain it, the full fare for most domestic flights, for instance booked through the website, remains about the same as it was before, typically around US$130 per leg.

However, it seems this fare has been vastly reduced (by more than 50%) to passengers who have booked their international flight to Addis Ababa with Ethiopia Airlines. In this case, the fare is typically around US$55-60 per leg!

So far as I understand it, to take advantage of this massive discount, you must first book, pay and be ticketed fir your international flights. With that ticket number, you or any operator can then book the domestic flights at any Ethiopian Airlines ticket office.

Of course, what happens in theory and in practice aren’t always quite the same thing, so feedback from anybody who tries this would be much appreciated!

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll be making two trips to Ethiopia later in the year to to the ground research for a revamped 7th edition of Bradt Ethiopia. I’ll be doing most of the ground work myself but would ideally want to find somebody based locally with some travel experience & reasonable writing skills to cover some of the more out-of-the-way areas in the second half of this year. If you are interested, please don’t respond below, but rather email me at phil [at] philipbriggs.com & philari [at] hixnet.co.za & we can take things from there. Thanks, Philip

Oromo People

Posted: April 27, 2014 in Uncategorized
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Inge Huver writes:

I just returned from my visit to Ethiopia and really liked the guidebook, in fact, my Ethiopian friends also liked it and I gave it to them as a present. Although, while reading we also saw one thing is completely wrong, and because it is a bit of a danger to use it in Ethiopia I’ll write it here. In the introduction, you write that hte Oromo people are also callad “Galla”. This is now a forbidden name, originally given to the people by their enemies. So using this name can give some problems.

Axum hotel feedback

Posted: May 13, 2013 in Uncategorized
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Susie Wieler writes:

I’m in Axum right now and after a horrible night at the Remhai Hotel, we found the new Sabean Hotel. It opened in November 2012 and we paid $89USD for a family suite with a very luxurious shower. It has a nice restaurant and café, as well as Wi-Fi in every room. We had lunch at the Yeha Hotel and asked to see their rooms, and the Sabean is definitely nicer and better value.

Link Ethiopia

Posted: April 14, 2013 in Uncategorized

Trixia Hayne writes: 

We were in Ethiopia working with Link Ethiopia (http://www.linkethiopia.org), a small British charity that aims to link schools in Ethiopia with partner schools in the UK, with a view to both educational support and cultural exchange.  The charity also supports schools directly through small-scale projects, and arranges for volunteers to teach English communication skills, as well as IT and (occasionally) PE; placements start from one month.

Price hike at Lalibela

Posted: March 12, 2013 in Lalibela, Uncategorized

Stephen Wood writes: Lalibela churches: since January (2013) the price of a ticket to visit the churches has been increased from $21 to $50! Our tour guide was quite apologetic about this, and said that the church authorities had insisted on this price hike. Still worth visiting them of course, but a bit annoying all the same. Panoramic View Hotel still looks nowhere near like finished (end January).